2nd Grade's future is so bright...

They have to BUILD shade! For the playground that is! Students have been studying the seasons, our sun, the moon and the stars. They figured out that the sun comes from the southeast during recess, and they designed shade covers for a place of respite.

Wiggins:

Waters:

Toomey:

Teuchert:

Smith:

Cervi:

Baer:

2nd grade is keeping it cool!

Our 2nd graders are wrapping a 9-week unit on the properties of matter. We looked at the three states (solid, liquid, gas), reversibility and irreversibility, and conductors and insulators. We capped off the quarter by designing / building / testing our own coolers made from household items!

Baer:

Cervi:

Smith:

Teuchert:

Toomey:

Waters:

Wiggins:

Here comes the sun!

Second grade is wrapping up a Project Lead The Way STEM project on how our sun moves through the sky! Students built shadow sticks (sundials), tracked the direction of sunlight using the Skyview app on our iPads, studied the effects of UV light (and made fun color changing bracelets), and then designed, built, tested and evaluated models of different ways to shade our playground from the midday sun. 

Waters: 

Cervi: 

Toomey: 

Wiggins: 

Teuchert: 

Smith: 

Baer: 

 

Brain Freeze!

Earlier this semester the 2nd graders tested the temperatures of different materials around the Science Lab trying to find out which made the best insulators or conductors. They used that knowledge to create homemade coolers that had to keep ice pops frozen for 40 minutes. If they succeeded, then they got to eat the ice pop! 

Wiggins:

Teuchert:

Smith:

Baer:

Waters:

Cervi:

Toomey: 

Cervi-ng up Legumes: #farmtoschool

Mrs. Cervi's 2nd graders recently harvested green beans from our gardens on Post Oak Tritt Road. Not only did they plant these beans 2 months ago, they've been caring for them with the rest of the 2nd grade team every since! The students helped wash and prep the beans, while Mrs. Cervi did all the cooking on our Mobile Cooking Cart from the Captain Planet Foundation. The beans were flavored with chives (also from the gardens) and salt & pepper. The lemonade was flavored by spearmint from the garden. 

We've got our toes in the (kinetic) sand.

Well, not our toes, but with as messy as the Lab was we might as well have used our toes! We've been covering properties of matter in 2nd grade, and this week we are trying to change the properties of sand! This field, "materials science", is fascinating! Here Mrs. Teuchert's class demonstrates: 

Here you can check out a video on "materials science" by the folks at Crash Course Kids: 

Our ingredients: mix 1 oz water with a teaspoon of dish soap and some food coloring. In a separate bowl combine 2 oz play sand and 1 oz corn starch. Combine both bowls and mix to desired consistency! 

"The Rise Of The Slime Economy" - NPR

From NPR: "It has become a social media sensation and even led to a run on glue sales. We're talking slime — and not the green liquid Nickelodeon famously dumps on celebrities. And for many young people on YouTube, Instagram and Etsy, it's a moneymaker.

Of the more than 5 million posts on Instagram tagged with #slime, most depict brightly colored stuff filled with glitter and pigments of all kinds. So the slime of today is far more viscous and elaborate than that green liquid on Nickelodeon. Slime has become so popular that the American Chemical Society recently published a fact sheet about it including a detailed scientific explanation for how the magic happens." Check out the rest of NPR's story about the escalating popularity of goo here

This week in 5th Grade we are using goo to learn about variables as a part of the scientific method. I'm partial to this recipe from the YouTube channel Get Crafty Crafty: 

Throwing Shade in 2nd Grade!

When visiting the Science Lab, Second Grade spent a lot of time this semester studying astronomy. We examined the rotation of the Earth and the affect on seasons; the sun's movement across by tracking shadows; the phases of the moon; the movement of the Big Dipper and other stars; and even learned about exoplanets and Trappist-1. 

Our engineering challenge came when we decided to add shade to a model of our playgrounds. Students had to track the sun during their recess time and determine where to add walls/trees/roofs/screens. You can take a look at their creative ideas below!

Why yes, the world does revolve around me.

Second graders (pictured: Mrs. Woolley's class) are investigating how the Sun's position changes throughout the day. How do you do that in a 45 minute class? You use the Skyview app on the iPads to track the Sun's orbit throughout the day and use flashlights to create your shadows! After an all-class example, students worked in groups to gather data that we'll graph next week to use to help Mylo/Suzi/Angelina solve a problem about shade at the playground. 

Keeping Cool with Mrs. Woolley's Class

Our students investigated and classified different kinds of materials by their observable properties, including color and texture. They learned about states of matter and properties of materials including insulators and conductors through an experiment using hand warmers and thermometers. In the design problem, Angelina, Mylo, and Suzi, are challenged to keep ice pops cold during a soccer game – without a cooler. We applied our knowledge and skills to determine the best material to solve this design problem.

Keeping Cool with Mrs. Teuchert's Class

Our students investigated and classified different kinds of materials by their observable properties, including color and texture. They learned about states of matter and properties of materials including insulators and conductors through an experiment using hand warmers and thermometers. In the design problem, Angelina, Mylo, and Suzi, are challenged to keep ice pops cold during a soccer game – without a cooler. We applied our knowledge and skills to determine the best material to solve this design problem.

Keeping Cool with Mrs. Gentry's Class

Our students investigated and classified different kinds of materials by their observable properties, including color and texture. They learned about states of matter and properties of materials including insulators and conductors through an experiment using hand warmers and thermometers. In the design problem, Angelina, Mylo, and Suzi, are challenged to keep ice pops cold during a soccer game – without a cooler. We applied our knowledge and skills to determine the best material to solve this design problem.

Keeping Cool with Ms. Gardner's Class

Our students investigated and classified different kinds of materials by their observable properties, including color and texture. They learned about states of matter and properties of materials including insulators and conductors through an experiment using hand warmers and thermometers. In the design problem, Angelina, Mylo, and Suzi, are challenged to keep ice pops cold during a soccer game – without a cooler. We applied our knowledge and skills to determine the best material to solve this design problem.

Keeping Cool with Mrs. Cervi's Class

Our students investigated and classified different kinds of materials by their observable properties, including color and texture. They learned about states of matter and properties of materials including insulators and conductors through an experiment using hand warmers and thermometers. In the design problem, Angelina, Mylo, and Suzi, are challenged to keep ice pops cold during a soccer game – without a cooler. We applied our knowledge and skills to determine the best material to solve this design problem.

Keeping Cool with Mrs. Baer's Class

Our students investigated and classified different kinds of materials by their observable properties, including color and texture. They learned about states of matter and properties of materials including insulators and conductors through an experiment using hand warmers and thermometers. In the design problem, Angelina, Mylo, and Suzi, are challenged to keep ice pops cold during a soccer game – without a cooler. We applied our knowledge and skills to determine the best material to solve this design problem.